Medical Tourism – CDC Advice

Some excellent advice from our friends at CDC about medical tourism. For the absolute avoidance of doubt, travel insurance does not exist to fund medical tourism.

Medical Tourism Switzerland

Medical Tourism – Not Covered by Travel Insurance

Travel insurance exists to cover unforeseen events. Planning to travel to another country in order to receive medical care upon arrival is not something that any Travel Medical Insurance plan is going to cover.

However, each year, people do take a trip solely for the purpose of medical tourism. As such, we thought the advice from CDC was pertinent.

Medical Tourism – Getting Medical Care in Another Country

Receiving medical care abroad can be risky. Learn about the risks and how to minimize them.

Medical Tourism – Going Abroad for Medical Care

Private Clinic Geneva

“Medical tourism” refers to traveling to another country for medical care. It’s estimated that thousands of US residents travel abroad for care each year. Many factors influence the decision to seek medical care overseas.  Some people travel for care because treatment is cheaper in another country. Other medical tourists may be immigrants to the United States who prefer to return to their home country for health care. Still others may travel to receive a procedure or therapy not available in the United States. The most common procedures that people undergo on medical tourism trips include cosmetic surgery, dentistry, and heart surgery.

Medical Tourism – Risks of Medical Tourism

The specific risks of medical tourism depend on the area being visited and the procedures performed, but some general issues have been identified:

  • Communication may be a challenge. Receiving care at a facility where you do not speak the language fluently might increase the chance that misunderstandings will arise about your care.
  • Medication may be counterfeit or of poor quality in some countries.
  • Antibiotic resistance is a global problem, and resistant bacteria may be more common in other countries than in the United States.
  • Flying after surgery can increase the risk of blood clots.

Medical Tourism – What You Can Do

  • If you are planning to travel to another country for medical care, see a travel medicine practitioner at least 4-6 weeks before the trip to discuss general information for healthy travel. Learn about specific risks related to the procedure and to travel before and after the procedure.
  • Make sure that any current medical conditions you have are well controlled, and that your regular health care provider knows about your plans for travel and medical care overseas.
  • Check the qualifications of the health care providers who will be doing the procedure and the credentials of the facility where the procedure will be done. Remember that foreign standards for health care providers and facilities may be different from those of the United States. Accrediting groups, including Joint Commission International, DNV International Accreditation for Hospitals, and the International Society for Quality in Healthcare, have lists of standards that facilities need to meet to be accredited.
  • Make sure you have a written agreement with the health care facility or the group arranging the trip, defining what treatments, supplies, and care are covered by the costs of the trip.
  • If you go to a country where you do not speak the language, determine ahead of time how you will communicate with your doctor and other people who are caring for you.
  • Take with you copies of your medical records that include the lab and other studies done relating to the condition for which you are obtaining care and any allergies you may have.
  • Bring copies of all your prescriptions and a list of all the medicines you take, including their brand names, generic names, manufacturers, and dosages.
  • Arrange for follow-up care with your local health care provider before you leave.
  • Before planning vacation activities, such as sunbathing, drinking alcohol, swimming, or taking long tours, find out if those activities are permitted after surgery.
  • Get copies of all your medical records before you return home.

Medical Tourism – Guidance from Professional Organizations

Safe travels.

Recent AardvarkCompare Travel Insurance Customer Reviews

TP1|AardvarkCompare.com

TP3 | AardvarkCompare.com

I Panicked When I Discovered
I panicked when I discovered the Travel Insurance I had through Expedia had expired when I changed my flight reservation.
When I went to renew I was told I couldn’t.
I discovered Aardvark on my AARP site and I was excited I could purchase an even better travel plan with cover starting with my trip departure, at a cost I could afford.
I was confused with the initial site and Mr. Breeze reached out to me for clarification.
He explained the policy more thoroughly and addressed all my concerns, can’t get any better than that!
Thank You Aardvark and thank you Jonathan for your assistance.
I can go on my trip now knowing I’ll be covered for medical emergencies and then some. 
Barbara

 

TP6 - AardvarkCompare Review | AardvarkCompare.com

Good Choices, Well Explained
I liked the way insurance was explained. I had read an article your company had written explaining Expedia trip cover versus other choices.
I used this advice to make the best choice for me and my traveling companions. That choice was to take a policy that provided much better medical and evacuation primary care.
Your site allowed comparisons, and I think I got the best value for my money. I don’t like constant follow up emails, though. You could back off a bit!!
Louise

 

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